Frances Ha

A solitary gaze, unreturned ?

Frances Ha

The most distinguishing feature (through the politics of differentiation) of Noah Baumbach’s Frances Ha from among other, any other modern picture is the wise usage of the black and white cinematography, or the restrictive element used to evoke a visual simulative dimension, in its narration. It not only propels you to minimalistically gauge the film the immediacy it displays and a nostalgic poignant vibration but also leads one to capture the vibrant energy of the modern youth in a distinct way.

The story line-
Frances (Greta Gerwig) is settled in new York, but doesn’t belong there. She is an apprentice for a dance cohere, but isn’t quite there as a dancer. Frances has a very close friend Sophie, but her relationship is a little embittered. This narrative is of a quirky woman and her characteristics dreams.

This might seem a loosely held film with a linear narrative, but on the contrary it is about the love of the ‘self’, notwithstanding the fact that there isn’t any glimpse of the narcissistic element which is usually usurped in the usual films, we get to see. It’s about what one values and how that establishes the core of an experience and further how those very engaging encounters lead to a formation of a moment. The feel of the film is like the French New Wave; perhaps Baumbach is asprational of the similar familiar. ( solitary gaze, unreturned )

Unlike Lena Fdunham’s character in Tiny Furniture, Frances is really like an interpretative signifier. Also, besides the film the ending begins with David Bowie’s Modern love which runs through the credits making me sit for entirely.

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